BDT maintains a comprehensive guide to DSL information. Using this guide, you can learn all necessary information regarding DSL installation, costs, benefits and disadvantages. If you have any questions regarding a DSL connection, do not hesitate to call BDT at (401) 331-4556 or email info@bdol.com.


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DSL vs Dial-Up |  DSL vs Cable Modem |  DSL vs ISDN |  DSL vs Dedicated

DSL vs. Dial-Up

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Issues DSL Dial-Up
Speed
  • DSL offers guaranteed speeds (symmetrical up to 1 Mbps or 35 times faster than 28.8 Kbps analog modem).
  • Dial-Up access offers speeds up to a maximum of only 56 Kbps.
Flexibility
  • DSL provides Internet access to multiple PCs/end-users on one single connection, thereby not charging extra for all additional PC/end-user access.
  • DSL is a fully scalable service possessing a wide range of potential speeds that are inexpensive and easy to upgrade.
  • Dial-Up access is capable of providing Internet access to only one PC/end-user, thereby charging extra for each additional PC/end-user access.
  • Dial-Up access is not a scalable service due to its bandwidth limitations of 56 Kbps.
Reliability
  • DSL, by being dedicated, avoids disruptive and time consuming process of dialing in for Internet access.
  • Dial-Up access is faced with the tedious process of dialing in for Internet access (evidenced from busy signals and frequent disconnections).
Price
  • DSL is priced on a flat monthly rate with no additional usage/toll charges.
  • DSL can be cost-effectively divided among multiple end-users for simultaneous access on a single connection.
  • Dial-Up access can have costly per-monthly usage/toll charges in addition to Internet access.
  • Dial-Up access must be provided with individual lines and modems for multiple end-users to have simultaneous access.
 

DSL vs. Cable Modem

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Issues DSL Cable Modem
Speed
  • DSL offers a wide range of guaranteed speeds as high as 1 Mbps (symmetrical).
  • Cable Modem exists on a shared network thereby making speed performance unpredictable; it is entirely contingent on network traffic volume.
Security
  • DSL is on a closed, dedicated circuit making it less susceptible to outside hackers.
  • Cable Modem is on a shared network making it more vulnerable to hackers.
Reliability
  • DSL is on a closed, dedicated circuit enabling BDT to offer guaranteed speeds.
  • Cable Modem exists on a shared network thereby making speed performance unpredictable.
  • Cable Modem may have multiple sources (or companies) providing local service and Internet access to consumers which takes away the convenience and accountability that comes with a single-source service provider.
Accessibility
  • DSL utilizes ubiquitous, 100-year-old telephone infrastructure (RJ-11 jacks, copper phone wire, data backbones,etc.), which makes up nearly 100% market accessibility.
  • Cable Modem utilizes young network infrastructure that is shown to have sporadic and inconsistent service availability.
  • Cable Modem has a slower rate of market infiltration because growth of accessibility is often on a case-by-case basis.
 

DSL vs. ISDN

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Issues DSL ISDN
Speed
  • DSL offers a wide range of guaranteed speeds up to 1 Mbps (symmetrical).
  • ISDN offers guaranteed speeds only up to 128 Kbps (which run on two channels at 64 Kbps each).
Flexibility
  • DSL is a fully scalable service possessing a wide range of potential speeds that are inexpensive and easy to upgrade.
  • DSL offers access speed (SDSL, ADSL) variations to best suit specific operational and economic business needs.
  • DSL can potentially replace or augment other existing services (dial-up, ISDN).
  • ISDN is not a scalable service; its maximum bandwidth is 128 Kbps making it unable to accomodate growing bandwidth demand.
Reliability
  • DSL has a low risk of ownership due to minimal hardware requirements.
  • ISDN has a high risk of ownership due to extensive hardware requirement.
Price
  • DSL has a low start-up cost by standard phone line(s) utilization and minimal equipment requirements.
  • DSL is typically priced on a flat monthly rate for Internet access-- with no additional usage/toll charges.
  • ISDN has a high start-up cost with extensive line and hardware install requirements.
  • ISDN can have costly per-monthly usage/toll charges in addition to Internet access.
 

DSL vs. Dedicated

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Issues DSL T 1
Speed
  • DSL is on a dedicated, closed circuit and therefore provides guaranteed speeds (symmetrical up to 1 Mbps and asymmetrical up to 7 Mbps).
  • T 1 is on a dedicated, closed circuit and therefore provides guaranteed speeds up to 1.54M (max).
Security
  • DSL is on a secured dedicated circuit which makes it nearly impenetrable to hackers.
  • T 1 is on a secured, dedicated circuit which makes it nearly infallible to hackers.
Flexibility
  • DSL often offers bundled, value-added services (voice/data, managed network services, long distance and local services, web hosting, and e-mail) from one provider on one invoice. DSL is a fully scalable service with quick and easy speed upgrade (no truck roll out).
  • T 1 also offers bundled, value-added services (voice/data, managed network services, long distance and local services, web hosting, and e-mail) from one provider on one invoice.
  • T 1 is a fully scalable service; however, a site visit is required for speed upgrade.
  • T 1 often times has more growth potential than DSL because it is not distant-sensitive.
  • T 1 has extensive and costly start-up with install of fiber lines and hardware (CSU/DSU, PBX).
Reliability
  • DSL is on a dedicated, closed circuit and therefore receives guaranteed speeds. There is a higher degree of accountability due to the fact that DSL is often a single source of contact because it offers bundled services including IP.
  • T 1 is on a dedicated, closed circuit and therefore receives guaranteed speeds.
  • T 1 has a higher degree of accountability due to the fact that it is often a single source of contact because it offers bundled services including IP
  • T 1 is not distant-sensitive and may have more growth potential (no contingencies on location and availability). 
Cost
  • DSL has low start-up cost and per-monthly fees by existing phone line(s) utilization and minimal equipment needs.
  • DSL is usually priced on a flat monthly rate with no per-minute charges.
  • T 1 often has costly start-up (line and hardware install) and per-monthly fees from line usage charges in addition to IP.
Long-Term Stability
  • DSL is intended as a long-term business solution because it not only provides dedicated, high-speed access, but also bundled, value-added services from a single provider on one invoice*
  • DSL is here to stay because it utilizes a ubiquitous infrastructure (RJ-11 jacks, copper phone wire, Class 5 switches and data backbones)
  • DSL can potentially replace or augment other existing services (T 1, dial-up, ISDN). 
  • T 1 will most likely be a long-term business solution because it has superior market confidence from long history of proven performance and boundless availability/accessibility.
  • T-1 is intended as a long-term business solution because it not only provides dedicated, high-speed access, but also bundled, value-added services from a single provider on one invoice*
Accessibility
  • DSL utilizes existing ubiquitous infrastructure (RJ-11 jacks, copper phone wire, Class 5 Switches, data backbones) and thus dramatically enhances the likelihood of present service availability.
  • DSL has greater exponential growth compared to rival technologies (Cable) due to wide range of coverage from CO implementation.
  • DSL is most likely to be available in commercial areas because DSL providers purposely target regions with a high density in businesses and phone lines.
  • T 1 has boundless availability/accessibility and consequently is not inhibited by technological, geographical or political barriers that rivals can not match.

What is DSL? |  Limitations of DSL? |  How Fast is DSL? |  Why DSL? |  Technology Comparison

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